Dichol

The thirty-eight vigorous contemporary East African narrative poems contained in this collection are diamonds in the rough that also herold a guess for the future of African orature in the tradition of the song style pioneered by Okot pBitek in the 60s.

The term dichol is basically an epithet in the Luo community, in whose setting most of these poems have been drawn. It means dark in complexion. The term is symbolically used to define and celebrate the African people and their cultures, and so are the poems contained herein. The silver lining in writing these poems is that this surely provides infinite appreciation of our rich cultural heritage. Reading these poems, one can document sound, music, dance, movement and colour, and voice performances accompanied by drums and a singing chorus that blend standard Luo vocabulary with a delivery style reminiscent of both praise singers and African storytellers.

The song and dance at once demystify poetry as an art, and rekindles our interest in African poetry as a functional tool for romanticised expressions that merit discussions in scholarly circles especially in our newly invigorated universities.

KShs 1,400

Book Details

Format

Paperback

Genre

African narrative poetry

Poems

38 poems

Publisher

Oba Kunta Octopus

Publication Date

December 2019

Pages

139

ISBN

978-1545356937

About The Author

Evelyne Ongogo

Evelyne Ongogo

Evelyne Ongogo is a teacher, writer, poet and a motivational speaker. She holds a Bachelor’s degree in Linguistics and Business Studies from University of Nairobi. Much of her published and unpublished work are in the genre of poems and short stories, mainly focussing on cultural issues in the present African reality. She is also a passionate writer of children’s stories. Her work also shows how the past affects the present African situations and challenges. Her poetry has yearly been published in the Kenya Music Festival syllabi and performed by schools and colleges as set pieces in the annual Kenya Music Festival competitions.

The thirty-eight vigorous contemporary East African narrative poems contained in this collection are diamonds in the rough that also herald a guess for the future of African orature in the tradition of the song style pioneered by Okot pBitek in the 60s.

The term dichol is basically an epithet in the Luo community, in whose setting most of these poems have been drawn. It means dark in complexion. The term is symbolically used to define and celebrate the African people and their cultures, and so are the poems contained herein. The silver lining in writing these poems is that this surely provides infinite appreciation of our rich cultural heritage. Reading these poems, one can document sound, music, dance, movement and colour, and voice performances accompanied by drums and a singing chorus that blend standard Luo vocabulary with a delivery style reminiscent of both praise singers and African storytellers.

The song and dance at once demystify poetry as an art, and rekindles our interest in African poetry as a functional tool for romanticised expressions that merit discussions in scholarly circles especially in our newly invigorated universities.

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